US Reverses Course on PEPFAR Cuts In South Africa as Demanded by Activists

The U.S. government has formally announced it is abandoning its previous policy of "transitioning" out of funding for South Africa's HIV treatment program--pledging $410 million next year to support the SA AIDS response.  This reflects a reversal of the Partnership Framework policy that activists in South Africa and the U.S. have sharply criticized--highlighted in the Health GAP report "The Politics of Transition" and analysis by TAC/MSF/Section 27.

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Health GAP Statement on House Appropriations for Global AIDS Funding

The House of Representatives Appropriations Committee has maintained insufficient flat funding levels for global AIDS in their appropriations bill for FY 2017.  This move by congressional legislators puts the historic opportunity to end the AIDS pandemic at stake. 

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Congress Must Increase Funding for Global AIDS Programs

The U.S. Congress is currently in the midst of the appropriations process - during which it decides how much money will be allocated to every U.S. government funded program. Under the Obama administration, funding for global AIDS programs has been consistently diminished or flat-lined since 2010. The President's budget request for FY2017, released earlier this year, continued this flat-funding for the PEPFAR program, despite the urgent need for a $500 million increase in order to scale up access to treatment and prevention services. In the coming months, Congress has the ability to change this. 

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Words Matter: A New United Nations Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS

(Originally posted on AIDS United.)

On June 8th, the United Nations adopted a new political declaration on HIV and AIDS. Health GAP joined many others from around the world in an effort to influence the content of this document in the weeks and days preceding the meeting—an effort that concluded with mixed results.

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Health GAP Statement on Hypocritical U.S. Attacks on Access to Medicines

Last week, the United States government reached new heights of hypocrisy when, in its speech to the UN General Assembly at the United Nations High-level Meeting on Ending AIDS, it claimed to support affordable access to medicines in one breath but, with the next, adopted Big Pharma’s talking points almost verbatim and attacked efforts by other governments to ensure affordable access to medicines.  

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